OUR DOLLS
Easy Skirt Pattern
Home
Guest Book
A Tour of Pleasantville
Photo Stories
Merchandise
Violet's Clothes Boutique
What is OUR DOLLS?
Traveling Dolls
Videos
Links
Doll Houses
Doll Crafts
Doll Chores
Doll Hairstyles
Doll Recipes
Doll Food
Doll Music
Doll Dresses
Doll Letters
Josefina's Remedies
The Fashions
Contests
Feedback
About Us
The Doll Nutcracker DVD
The Doll Nutcracker Reviews
Movie News
Our Dolls video reviews
News Archives

Photobucket

Make your doll a skirt to wear around the house!  This skirt is based on the Montoya skirt pattern that all of the girls use, but it can be used for Larson skirts and Parkington skirts if you pick the appropriate fabrics.

For Montoyas: heavy woven fabrics, bright colors and patterns.
For Larsons: cottons, lighter pastel colors, blues and grays, and quilting prints like little flowers or plaids.
For Merrimans: solid silks, or cottons.
For Parkingtons: satins, silks, embroidered fabrics, or anything that looks exotic, like Asian prints.

Photobucket

You will need:
 
A large pad of paper or posterboard

A pin cushion

Straight pins

Sewing scissors

A pencil

A ruler

Your choice of fabric

Snaps

Needle
 
Thread of a matching color


Photobucket

On the sheet of paper, mark a length of 8.5 inches with your pencil and ruler.

Photobucket

At a right angle to this line, mark another longer line that is 15 inches long.

Photobucket

You can make this skirt in several different sizes.  The one i'm giving instructions for is for an American Girl doll size.

American Girls: 
Skirt:  8.5" x 15"
Waistband:  1.25" x 6"

Little Girls (like My Twinn Cuddly sisters):
Skirt:  7.5" x 13"
Waistband:  1.25" x 4"

Parents (like My Twinn dolls):
Skirt:  14" x 20"
Waistband: 2" x 8"

Photobucket

On the shorter end of the finished pattern (close up the other edges to form a rectangle pattern) write FOLD.

Photobucket

Make the waistband pattern using the same method.  The measurements for the waistband are 1.25" x 6".
Write fold on the small end.

Photobucket

On both patterns, draw a line that goes up and down along the width. 

This is called the "grain line." 

If you are using a fabric that has stripes on it, the grain line shows you how to line up the pattern piece with the stripes so the dress turns out with all the stripes going the same way. 
For this pattern, the grain line is very simple- just up and down on both pattern pieces.

Photobucket

Now take your fabric and lay it out on a large surface where you have plenty of room.  Fold the fabric over on top of itself, and at the edge where the fabric is folded over itself, line up the side of the pattern that says "FOLD."

Also, make sure that your grain line is going the same direction as the stripes in your fabric. 

Pin the patterns to the fabric.

Photobucket

Notice how the edge marked "FOLD" is lined up with the folded part of the material.

This will give you a piece of fabric that is twice as long as the pattern that you made, without having to sew two pieces of fabric together.

Photobucket

Using your sewing scissors, carefully cut the fabric around the pinned pattern pieces.

Photobucket

When you are done cutting, you will have two pieces of fabric cut out that are twice as long as the original pattern pieces.

Photobucket

Choose an edge of the skirt (the larger pattern piece) to be your hem. 
Fold the fabric over to create a hem, and pin it into place.

You can do a double hem if you want it to be especially sturdy- just fold it over on itself one more time and then pin it.

Photobucket

Using a thread that matches your fabric, carefully stitch along the hem that you just pinned, taking out the pins as you go.

(HINT: I have used a bright yellow thread for this pattern so you can see where the stitches are!  I would normally choose a dark brown or a dark red thread for this type of fabric.)

Photobucket

Once you have finished the hem, tie off the thread and cut it.  Now you are going to gather the TOP of the skirt, which is the end opposite to the one you just hemmed.

Make sure you have plenty of thread, and start stitching along the raw edge of the skirt top.  As you go, however, pull tight on the thread to make the skirt bunch up behind you. 

This is called gathering.

Photobucket

Don't tie off the end of the gathered top. 

Here is a picture of the skirt all bunched up, but you'll notice that there is not enough room for a doll's waist up there!

Photobucket

Go get a doll or a dress form to try the skirt on for size.  Before tying off the thread, hold the gathered edge of the skirt up to the waistline of your doll, and fit the size.

You may have to loosen the gathering a little bit to make it fit.  When it does, tie it off.

Photobucket

Pin the edge of the waistband pattern, as well as the two ends, leaving one long edge open.

Photobucket

Hem the edges with your needle and thread, and tie off on the end.

Photobucket

Line the hemmed edge of the waistband up with the gathered top of the skirt.

Photobucket

Fold the other edge down under the skirt so the waistband is covering up all of the gathering. 

PIn the waistband down.

Photobucket

Sew along the edge that you've pinned, taking out the pins as you go.

HINT:  Try to make your stitches go up and down in the same places that you already stitched on the hem of the waistband.  This makes the whole thing look tidier.

Photobucket

Now, turn the skirt inside out and fold it over itself.

Photobucket

Lining up the two short edges of the skirt (front edges facing in) pin them together.

Photobucket

Sew up the section you've pinned. 

Make sure to leave a little room at the top without sewing.

Photobucket

Sew a hem along the leftover section of fabric.

Leaving this open will help you get the skirt onto your doll.

Photobucket

Sew snaps onto the edges of the waistband.

Photobucket

Try the skirt on your doll or dress form and close the snaps to make sure it fits.

Photobucket

Your skirt is finished!  Congratulations!



DISCLAIMER 
This website and it's contents are in no way officially related to Pleasant Company, American Girl, My Twinn, Magic Attic, Gotz or any of the companies mentioned on these pages. 
 
These pages are for the display of the private collection of the Gothard Sisters, and for the sale of certain homemade items which we have copyright over.